Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

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Question 1:

From Joseph:
I bought a new house in 2017 and instead of moving a lot of tools, I sold most of them and started over with new ones. There are 2 things I haven't yet invested in  - a router table and a dado stack. I'm primarily a hand tool guy, but I like to use power tools for dados/grooves and rabbets. Currently I am using my tablesaw with a FTG blade to nibble away at them, but I've reached my breaking point and want something a bit faster. I've used both a dado stack and a router table in the past. Both have some pluses and minuses for me; set up time being a major minus, but equally annoying for each. I'm also open to other alternatives that don't include joinery planes. Been there, bought the planes, sold the planes. I'm a lefty, and using planes right handed isn't fun for me.

Question 2:

From Nick:
I have a question regarding a long distance relationship with a beautiful jointer. I am member of a "local" woodworking guild which has nice shop that is outfitted with a 16" jointer, a few nice planers. Unfortunately, I live a little over 2 hours away and at my home shop I currently only have a DW735 planer and no jointer. I would like to use all this nice equipment to do everything required to get straight, flat and square stock to take home and finish my projects. My concern is that by the time I throw it in the back of the truck and drive 2 hours home I would defeat the purpose. Does wood move that quickly when you're driving 80... ahem.. 70 mph? Can I get home and put in my climate controlled basement shop before I've warped everything out of flat/square? How would weather effect this (i.e. cold dry winter/hot humid summer weather?).

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique
Mike: Peter Galbert using a heat gun to straighten out riven stock Bob: Flush cutting on the tablesaw

Ben: Drawing an extra line when sawing on the left side of your layout line

Question 3:  

From Jim:
I am planning to build a sewing table for my wife. The plans call for using cherry plywood for several major panels of the case. While the stability of plywood is certainly an advantage, it is expensive and I like the idea of using glued up panels made from 4/4 stock. What would you do and why?

Recommendations:

Ben - Sharpen your marking gauge, because you know it's dull
Mike -  Get a Soda Stream


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-191.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

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Question 1:

From Tom:
I’m now semi-retired and finally have the time to create a decent wood shop. I’ve moved to the Florida panhandle, where there are few hardwood dealers. In late May, I’ll be in Tennessee so I intend to stop in at a hardwood dealer/mill near Nashville. Given the projects on my to do list I’ll be picking up walnut, cherry, and ash. I also have my eye on black locust (for a picnic table), popular, box elder (table legs and aprons), and catalpa (ditto). Given the list of woods on the dealer's inventory list, I feel like a kid in a candy store. Perhaps too much like a kid in a candy store. I’d be interested in your collective wisdom about how one might go about stocking a new shop with wood, especially given the fact that the nearest hardwood dealer for a hobbyist is 5-6 hours away (Atlanta) and I don’t drive through Tennessee regularly enough to stop in at a dealer or mill whenever I need something (they are about 11 hours away). Y’all are fortunate to live where you do from a woodworking perspective, but I’ll take our weather over yours … I have lemons and tangerines on the trees in my front yard. :-)

Question 2:

From Richard:
Have you ever heard of hollowing the backs of western chisels? To speed the process of flattening the back of a chisel, my buddy first hollows the center to a depth of about 1 or 2 thousands of an inch with a dremel sanding flap attachment . The edges and toe are not touched by the sander. My buddy says that because the hollow is so slight, it is as easy to re-flatten the back and establish a new flat spot as it is to re-establish the cutting edge of a worn Japanese chisel.

  • Here is the video that Anissa mentions, which she now admits he obviously had running in the dremel

Segment: Smooth Move

Ben: Drilling a depth-indication hole on the wrong side.
Barry: Trimming the horns of a frame and panel too soon.
Anissa: Forgetting that two years ago she grain matched the tops of three cabinets, then ignoring the grain match while fitting the cabinets with drawers.

Question 3:

From Jesse:
I’ve recently started the journey into furniture making.  I have a sliding miter saw and a very old table saw that is only good for rough cutting. I’m looking to purchase a band saw or jointer/planer combo. I only have room for one and only 110v availability. I am using hand saws and hand planes to do most of the dimensioning of my lumber. For a beginner, who has limited space and time in the shop, would a band saw or jointer/planer be more advantageous? I’d appreciate any guidance you can offer to ensure my next big purchase is a wise choice and will be the most practical.

Recommendations:

Ben - Prismacolor Premier Pencil Sharpener
Barry - Kettlebells for holding panel glue ups flat
Anissa -  A rock 


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-190.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:52am EDT

Guest 1: Joe Taylor - Director of Sales for Rikon Joe gave us the ins and outs of a few of Rikon's new products

Model 10-326DVR: 14″ Deluxe Bandsaw with Smart Motor DVR Control

  • Blade Speed – Variable from 100 RPM (45 SFPM) to 2,375 RPM (4400 SFPM)
  • Continuous Torque – 1.75 HP will never slow down producing a beautiful/smooth cut
  • Safer Operation – Fast electronic braking and load spike detection
  • Patent Pending – Spring Loaded Tool-less Guide System
  • Effortless Cutting – Fifteen suggested speed settings for wood/metal/plastic plus one custom range
Joe shared some exciting news about the Model 70-800: 4-Piece Woodturning System

Guest 2: Nancy Hiller

From Jim: In terms of their aesthetic value, is there a line for you between fine furniture and cabinetry?

From Jeff: If you could only design, or build, which would it be and why?

Free Plan: Architectural Wall Cabinet Arts and crafts maker presents a fresh twist on a period design by Nancy R. Hiller #270–Sep/Oct 2018 Issue
The Pro's Corner Professional woodworkers sharing the information, for professional woodworkers new and old

Guest 3: Christian Becksvoort

From Scott: What are your top five records at the moment?

From Josh: What Shaker element do see reproduced poorly in modern versions of the classics?

From Erick: What finish are you using on most of your pieces, polyurethane or oil? And why?

Article Image A True Oil Finish Nontoxic and easily repaired, this traditional finish is still worth considering by Christian Becksvoort #152–Nov/Dec 2001 Issue 
The Classic Shaker Style Discover the difference between the masterful and the near-miss by Christian Becksvoort #229–Nov/Dec 2012 Issue 

Guest 4: Vic Tesolin

From Kevin: What aspects of woodworking do you see most newer students totally over think?

From Steve: Awhile ago, you posted a video of a tattoo that had leaves representing your favorite woods to work with. For those of us who are crap at identifying tree leaves, what are your favorite woods to build with?

4 Planes for Joinery Get perfect dadoes, grooves, rabbets, and tenons in no time By Vic Tesolin #246–Mar/Apr 2015 Issue
7 Questions with Vic Tesolin Simple really, we ask Vic questions, and he answers them

Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-189.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:22am EDT

Question 1:

From Al: I am having some trouble laying out the pins and tales on the Wenge in the more traditional way, unlike what Mike shows.  Wenge is extremely hard and not at all forgiving and the grain tends to be a problem in scribing the wood. Perhaps this is why he choose to do this with the table saw and router methods as shown on Rough Cut.  Where can I get the table saw blade and the router bit to do it like Mike. He always has great ideas that are very valuable.

  • The Whiteside router bit Mike mentions can be found here

Question 2:

From Madison: I was wondering how long it took Mike to build the tea box featured in magazine issue 269.  

Segment:  Ben: Steam bending everything!

Question 3:

From Matt: How would someone go about preparing kumiko strips without a tablesaw or drum sander?  


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-188-pregame.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00am EDT

Question 1: From Paul: Heide Martin’s serving trays in the May/June 2018 are beautiful and I have since made a couple. My question is about keeping the bottom boards flat. I cut some walnut that had been air dried for probably 20 years. In an hour or two both boards cupped. I then sequentially tried wetting one side, wetting both sides, soaking in water, soaking in fabric softener, each time clamping the boards to keep them flat and leaving for days and days to dry out. None of these things worked and in the end I ended up using some walnut plywood instead. How do you folks keep wide, thin boards flat?

Question 2: From Richard: In reality we all have limited amount of shop time available.  However, if the amount of time you could work on a project was not limited what one piece would you choose to make?

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique

Mike: Using pocket holes to quickly make and change full-size mockups

Tom: Beveling an edge of a workpiece with a handplane

Ben: Riding the back of the blade to start a cut on the edge of workpiece

Question 3:   From Mark: I have been building furniture full-time for just over a year. Is it legal and/or ethical to build something from the magazine or a video workshop and then sell it? For instance, if a client asks me to build 4 Adirondack chairs, my thought is build them loosely based on what I find at Fine Woodworking, vs. reinventing the wheel with my own design every-time.

Question 4: From John: I was reading a FWW article by Steve Latta in issue #241 about draw-bored tenons where he said, “I make pins from riftsawn or quartersawn stock...”. If you’re making dowels, how can it possibly make any difference whatsoever if you use quartersawn or plain sawn boards? I still like Steve Latta, btw.  Keep up the great work, see y’all at FWWlive!


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-187.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:24am EDT

Question 1: From Harry: How can I prevent Camellia from becoming all gummy. After letting a plane set for a few weeks that had been wiped down with Camellia Oil it was next to impossible to get the plane apart. I actually caused some minor damage it was stuck so hard.

Rollie’s answer: On tools if you have areas that the oil is applied to that don’t see use it can build a bit, but not much and over a long period of time. A quick wipe with a bit of naphtha or acetone will clean it off. Those solvents are essential because they are fully volatile and won’t leave any oily residue, which mineral spirits will do.

Question 2: From Mike: In in a couple months I will be building a house and I will be putting my shop in the basement. Currently I have a small shop, but in my new shop it will be large (about 25x35). Since I have this rare opportunity, I want to put power in the floor and dust collection the floor. Therefore, I have to decide where to put my tools and I will not be able to move them. Are there general guidelines on placement of tools? How far should a table saw be away from a wall? What about a bandsaw, how far from a wall or in the sides? Same question for a router table, jointer and thickness planer.

Segment: All-Time Favorite Technique

Mike: Using a bendy stick to hold in moldings as you glue them

Anissa: A Box Worth Repeating by Laura Mays #240–May/June 2014 Issue

Ben: Using blue tape and CA glue as a stand-in for double-sided tape

Mike’s double-down technique: Using a bendy ruler clamped in a pipe clamp as a curve bow


Question 3:  

From Chris:
Do those of you with kids suffer like I do from a never ending queue of fix it items that are piled on the workbench and take precedence over projects? It’s fun to hack together solutions for beloved toys, and see the delight on their faces when it works, but it sucks up most of my limited shop time. Any tips on quick fixes, or do I just need to wait this period out until they are teenagers?

Question 4:

From Jim:
I recently upgraded table saws with a killer deal on a used Delta Unisaw with a Unifence. I'm used to a Biesemeyer fence, and have a number of jigs utilizing the parallel faces of the fence, such as an L fence. I do not think I can use these jigs on the Unifence because it lacks the parallel faces necessary to track or clamp the jigs. Any ideas for Unifence modification or other tricks to increase the utility of the Unifence?

Recommendations:

Ben - StewMac’s YouTube Channel
Anissa - Jonathan Livingston Seagull
Mike -  Lee Valley - Lee Valley Toggle Clamp Plate


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-186.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:13pm EDT

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna! The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II

Question 1: From Shawn: I’m working on a Christmas present for my sister.  It’s a hallway table with 2 drawers in cherry. This is the first piece I’ve made with cherry.  Some of the surfaces have a quarter sawn grain orientation and I’m finding them highly prone to tear out. My card scraper seems to be the only tool I’ve got that can tackle it, and even then I still have to pay really close attention to the changing grain direction. I’d like to hear any recommendations you might have about tools and techniques to deal with tear out, and also about other tear out prone woods you’ve worked with. I’ve found quarter sawn maple to be difficult as well.

Question 2: From Joe: To build a bed for my grandson I ordered 50 bd ft of rough lumber,  Black walnut. The wood was beautiful but this is where my confusion began. I got the job done but I don't know if I went about it the best way. The bed with headboard, frame, 6 drawers underneath, and footboard had over 100 pieces. All the lumber was about 8 inches wide and about 10 feet long. Is it better to mill the long boards and then layout all the parts, or layout the parts oversize and cut them out and send smaller pieces through the planer and jointer?

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool

Mike: 6-in. Combo Square
Bob: Stanley #4–Type 11
Ben: Lie Nielsen honing guide

Question 3:   From Mike: I’ve come to realize my jointer needs tuning, and i recall you guys saying how you set your outfeed table a hair lower than your cutter head. I can’t find the episode that contains this discussion, but i don’t recall there being any reasoning for this. I adjusted mine as y’all suggested but found this was causing the trailing ends of the boards to not touch the blades. After reading my powermatic manual, it says to have the outfeed table level with blade, so what’s up with your hack causing me this grief?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-185.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:30am EDT

Chris Schwarz is a furniture maker and writer who works from a German barroom built in 1896 in Covington, Ky. He is one of the founders of Lost Art Press, a book-publishing company that specializes in handwork, and Crucible Tool, a company that makes hand tools for woodwork. Chris is the author of several books, including Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use (F+W Media), The Anarchist’s Tool Chest, Campaign Furniture, The Anarchist’s Design Book and Ingenious Mechanics (Lost Art Press). In addition to his publishing efforts, he builds casework and Welsh stick chairs for clients all over the world.

Chris' class at Fine Woodworking Live is titled: Compound-Angle Joinery, Minus the Math
Mastering compound angles typically means mastering trigonometry. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Compound angles can be measured, laid out, and cut without any math—or even numbers. Chris will show you the methods he uses for replicating unusual (sometimes radical) compound angles to build his Welsh stick chairs. The method requires just a wire clothes hanger, a sliding bevel, and a ruler. (Oh, and you’ll also need to bring an open mind.) The technique allows you to replicate compound angles from photos or drawings, or to create new designs using half-scale models (made with that clothes hanger).

Register now for Fine Woodworking Live 2019!

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna!

The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II
Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-184.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:13am EDT

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna! The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II 

Question 1:

From William: I live in Ohio where the Emerald Ash Borer is ravaging every ash tree around. With all these ash trees coming down and the infestation of the Ash Borer, are we looking at a future shortage of ash trees?  Should we, as woodworkers, stock up on quality ash boards while we can get them and while they're fairly inexpensive?

Question 2:

From Paul: I’ve started looking for a better sketchbook and am overwhelmed by the choices.  I’ve heard Mike talk about the books he uses, but I’ve never heard him mention the brand or “model” he favors.  On STL 155 he mentioned 60-80 lb paper, spiral bound, unruled, 6x9 size. Frankly, that limits it to about half a zillion options and it’s very hard to judge quality even touching the book at the local art supply place.  So please spill, Mike!

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool

Question 3:  

From Caleb: I'm wondering if any of you have used a hollow chisel mortiser as a drill press? Is this a viable way to get around buying a drill press?

Question 4:

From Chris: What books inspire you to get out to your shop and build something? Any favorite books on the history of woodworking and maybe different trends through the ages? Or books specific to a style of working, like Shaker or arts & crafts, etc.? And from Larry: I would love to see a Live Talk episode on “go to books” reference books for novice woodworkers.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-184.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:53am EDT

Leave a comment on this episodes show notes page to be entered in the giveaway of Craig Thibodeau's book, The Craft of Veneering.

 Peter Galbert’s FWW Live 2018 Keynote Speech - Unsurprisingly, the journey of a windsor chairmaker is rarely a straight line


 

Question 1:

From David: I have avoided cordless power tools because as a hobbyist and renter, I seldom use the tools outside of the basement workshop. I've been told I don't know what I'm missing, but it seems my wallet prefers it that way.  I'm most concerned about trying to commit to one brand/manufacturer or contend with the expense and hassle of having multiple chargers and batteries that aren't compatible. Do you feel as though it makes sense to keep all of your cordless power tools within the same brand? Or is my concern unfounded? If you had to commit to a brand, what would they be and why?

Question 2:

From Harry: How can I prevent Camellia from becoming all gummy. After letting a plane set for a few weeks that had been wiped down with Camellia Oil it was next to impossible to get the plane apart. I actually caused some minor damage it was stuck so hard.

Segment: Smooth Move Ben: Not looking at the fine print on a router bearing Anissa: Not looking at the sticker telling her which way to assemble a part on a dust collector


Question 3:  

From J: Hey folks, I recently volunteered to be the shop manager for my local guild of woodworkers.  We have a 16” Oliver that apparently, according to some, must never have its bed waxed. They prefer it is cleaned only with kerosene, the reason being that it’s believed waxing a jointer bed will cause glue joints to fail. Any merit to this train of thought? Or can I just wax it and make everyone’s lives easier.

  • Mike recommendation of TopCote is now called GlideCote
  • Ben uses and recommends SlipIt

Question 4:

From Joe: I’ve gotten very good at sharpening my hand plane blades as well as making my wood surface feel silky smooth off the hand plane.  When using a 2 pound cut shellac as a finish, do I need to rough up wood surface with sandpaper (such as 300 grit) so the shellac can stick better to the wood surface?


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-183.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:20pm EDT

Normally here I post a bunch of links. I'm going to be honest, you just need one link on this, Craig's website. Everything he discusses is easily found on his website, and the site itself is wonderfully done. It's worth going to just to see how a real pro presents their work. Plus, while you're there you can buy a signed copy of his book! -Ben

https://ctfinefurniture.com/

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-182.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:48am EDT

How Ben finished Mike's spoon - Finish Greenwood Spoons Like a Pro by Emmet Van Driesche

Question 1: From Fabian: I have a sliding table saw and struggle to convert all the jigs mentioned in the magazine to fit my saw. How would you attach for example a kumiko grid jig as used by Mike in the article "Spice up your work with kumiko" to the saw? Do I fasten it with bolts to the crosscut fence or just let it ride in the one miter slot in the sliding table? In either case it is just secured on the left side of the blade.

Question 2: From Chris: I'm on the lookout for a new paste wax solution. I'm totally over the petroleum smell of commercial options, and would love something simple with just a bit of luster to apply to my projects. Has Mike ever shared his recipe to attempt to recreate the non-longer-available Goddard's Cabinet Makers Wax? I never used the product in its original form, but I'm sold on his description of it. Something natural, simple, and lemon-scented sounds like the perfect solution for me.

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool of All Time… for this week Tom: Cabinet scraper and card scraper
Mike: Dead blow mallet to straighten his folded-back backsaw
Ben: ARK Shark Guard for his Delta Unisaw

Question 3:   From Josh: I see pictures posted online where people have gotten a completely mirror polished edge on a chisel or plane iron. I’m using a Norton 1000 water stone, followed by a King 3000, followed by a Norton 8000 stone. I can’t seem to get that mirror polish. I still end up with some scratches, no matter how long I work with the 8000 stone, even when honing a new blade. I know Mike recommends 1000/4000/8000, but Lie Nielsen skips the intermediate grit, so I don’t think the 3000 stone is my problem. I’ve thought about trying to get a finer stone than the 8000 I have, but I don’t want a $100 experiment.

Question 4: From Peter: The cement floor of my shop is unsealed and kind of wrecks my feet after a day in the shop. Keeping in mind that it’s a rental, do you have any recommendations for an affordable flooring option that may help my feet and also protect my equipment from the sludge that melts off my wife’s car? It needs to be solid enough that I can have my lathe on that won’t increase vibration.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-182.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Check out our newest video workshop, Enfield Cupboard with Hand Tools featuring Chris Gochnour and be sure to help us make our video workshops even better by filling out this quick survey.

Question 1: From Dean: I have an enjoyable dilemma. I am building a garage with adjacent shop space at our north home.  The shop is 200 sq-ft, one third the size of my St. Paul shop, and thus creates a challenge adapting to a small space. I have been devouring all the FWW articles on small shops and believe I can make this space workable but I will have to make some concessions, mainly my tablesaw, jointer, and planer. Will I be satisfied and served by a portable, contractor-style table saw and a combination jointer-planer?  

Question 2: From Tanc: Is there a guideline for when stretchers are needed to strengthen a piece? I am looking to build an entryway table from oak that is 32-in. high, 60-in. long, 12-in. deep, with a  2 ½-in. apron and 2-in. legs that taper down to 1-in. I prefer simple designs, and would rather not have stretchers.

Ben's mockup of Tanc's table with the given dimensions:

Benside Table:

Segment: Smooth Moves

  • John: Not cleaning the lint off of a new floor finish applicator
  • Anissa: Touching a friends piece of furniture while the finish was still wet
  • Ben: Trusting a tool that should never have been trusted


Question 3:   When I set up my workshop, I positioned the bench facing a south-facing window and installed fluorescents directly above the bench at about eight feet above the floor. If I have a board on edge, any markings on the side facing my body are difficult to see because that area is in shadow. I want to avoid using task lights wherever possible, as they just get in the way. I'm thinking that more overhead lighting is the answer.  Do you have any thoughts about where this should be positioned to minimize shadow areas when working at the bench?

Question 4: From David: I am baffled that some ash stock I milled a couple months ago is now nearly impossible to plane. I cut and milled the ash for a small box a while ago. It was wonderful to work with and easy to plane. I put the pieces aside to enjoy the far too short Minnesota summer. I kept it in the same place all my wood stock lives; my basement workshop. I was looking forward to getting back to work on the box. I decided to plane all the pieces again, assuming it wouldn’t be flat and square as it was months ago. I was dumbfounded that it was nearly impossible to plane. I used the exact same plane I used originally. I ended up resharpening the blade twice and adjusted it to take the finest possible shaving. Still it would stick and chatter across the board and leave tear out in the middle of smooth grain. To make sure I wasn’t hallucinating, I tried planing some oak and some twisty walnut. It performed beautifully. It was as though it had developed a skin of steel in the time since I first milled it. Any ideas about what/why this happened?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-181.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Check out our newest video workshop, Enfield Cupboard with Hand Tools featuring Chris Gochnour and be sure to help us make our video workshops even better by filling out this quick survey.

Question 1: From Dean: I have an enjoyable dilemma. I am building a garage with adjacent shop space at our north home.  The shop is 200 sq-ft, one third the size of my St. Paul shop, and thus creates a challenge adapting to a small space. I have been devouring all the FWW articles on small shops and believe I can make this space workable but I will have to make some concessions, mainly my tablesaw, jointer, and planer. Will I be satisfied and served by a portable, contractor-style table saw and a combination jointer-planer?  

Question 2: From Tanc: Is there a guideline for when stretchers are needed to strengthen a piece? I am looking to build an entryway table from oak that is 32-in. high, 60-in. long, 12-in. deep, with a  2 ½-in. apron and 2-in. legs that taper down to 1-in. I prefer simple designs, and would rather not have stretchers.

Ben's mockup of Tanc's table with the given dimensions:

Benside Table:

Segment: Smooth Moves

  • John: Not cleaning the lint off of a new floor finish applicator
  • Anissa: Touching a friends piece of furniture while the finish was still wet
  • Ben: Trusting a tool that should never have been trusted


Question 3:   When I set up my workshop, I positioned the bench facing a south-facing window and installed fluorescents directly above the bench at about eight feet above the floor. If I have a board on edge, any markings on the side facing my body are difficult to see because that area is in shadow. I want to avoid using task lights wherever possible, as they just get in the way. I'm thinking that more overhead lighting is the answer.  Do you have any thoughts about where this should be positioned to minimize shadow areas when working at the bench?

Question 4: From David: I am baffled that some ash stock I milled a couple months ago is now nearly impossible to plane. I cut and milled the ash for a small box a while ago. It was wonderful to work with and easy to plane. I put the pieces aside to enjoy the far too short Minnesota summer. I kept it in the same place all my wood stock lives; my basement workshop. I was looking forward to getting back to work on the box. I decided to plane all the pieces again, assuming it wouldn’t be flat and square as it was months ago. I was dumbfounded that it was nearly impossible to plane. I used the exact same plane I used originally. I ended up resharpening the blade twice and adjusted it to take the finest possible shaving. Still it would stick and chatter across the board and leave tear out in the middle of smooth grain. To make sure I wasn’t hallucinating, I tried planing some oak and some twisty walnut. It performed beautifully. It was as though it had developed a skin of steel in the time since I first milled it. Any ideas about what/why this happened?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-181.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Question 1: From Cameron: I’m thinking of making a bench inspired by Mark Edmundson’s “Modern Danish Cord Bench” from issue #194-Nov/Dec 2007. I’m want to stretch the width to 6’ to use at my 7’ table.  Will the front and rear rails be enough to support 4 well fed adults or will I have a hilarious story to tell for the next 30 year about the thanksgiving collapse of 2019?

Question 2: From Mark: I saw a video where Matt Wajda drew a tool chest, full scale by hand.  Is this a common method? I draw Architecture for a living, I am tired of drawing.  I’m not interested in SketchUp, I already spend way too much time with AutoCAD. Woodworking is my release. I completely understand that you can work issues out on paper long before you even touch a board.  I am curious about designing without drawing. Does anyone you know use a design process that does not involve drawing?

Segment: Shop Resolutions

  • Mike - Learn a new skill this year
  • Anissa - Draw every day
  • Ben - Finish working on his shop, and start working in his shop… by May

Question 3: From Andy: Any idea how to go about achieving the finish in the attached image? I’ve never seen a finish like this one that’s pretty vibrant, yet maintains the appearance of the grain. Is it just a watered down paint?

Question 4: From Bob: I have some Japanese chisels that I’m starting to use.  About 3/16” behind the edge of the blade is a cove. When you grind back to that cove, the back will no longer be flat.  Do you have to toss the chisel out at that point?


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-180.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Question 1:

From Tony:

We hear so much talk about  Lie Nielsen, Veritas, and Stanley hand planes but, I have a Millers Falls No. 8 that i picked up from an Antique store, that works really well. I don't think I’ve ever heard the Millers Falls Name be mentioned on the Podcast, so I am wondering if they’re any good? They seem to have been in contention with Stanley and they are American made from New England no less, since 1868!

Question 2:

From Matt:

I have been wanting to do a project using drawbore mortise and tenon joints. Is it a bad idea to attempt this type of joint in a softer woods like cherry or walnut, rather than oak.

Segment: Smooth Move

  • Mike - Forgetting that someone commissioned something from him, not those he looks up to
  • Barry - Making a mistake on a piece, remaking the piece, then accidentally using the mistake on the final piece
  • Ben - Trying to get away with not making a proper sled and accidentally dropping a piece on the tablesaw blade

Question 3:

From Bob: Can someone explain the difference between a scrub plane and a smooth plane? They seem similar in size and construction.

Question 4:

From Phillip:

I am looking to build a dining room table to a friend of mine, and am wondering what type of wood would be best to use. I have narrowed it down to White Oak, Cherry, and Walnut. The friend that I am making this for is a military man, and so gets stationed at different bases around the country every few years. My main concern is the table warping or splitting due to the drastic location and environmental changes that he will come across. Obviously, being a dining room table it also must be sturdy and not be too prone to scratches, dings, etc. White Oak is very wear resistant, but has a medium-high shrinkage value. Cherry is pretty stable once dried, but is softer and may get more dings. Walnut seems to be the middle road, being harder and less susceptible to scratches than Cherry but less likely to shrink/warp than White Oak.

What type of wood would you suggest that is going to be resistant to scratches and dings, yet won't warp or split in drastic climate changes? 

Recommendations:

Barry - Dedicated Shop Shoes
Ben - Chris Thile's Thank You, New York"
Mike - Tom Waits' album Swordfish Trombones


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-179.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:58am EDT

To enter to win Bob Van Dyke's sharpening box from issue #254:

  1. Leave a comment on this episode's show-notes page
  2. Head over to the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking site and sign up for their email list

We’ll pick a winner December 21, 2018.

Question 1:

From Amy: I've been using a piece of vegetable tanned leather with green waxy honing compound as a strop. I start by rubbing compound onto the shiny side of the leather. However, when I go to strop my carving knives, the pressure from my blade compresses the compound and it flakes off. Is there something wrong with my compound, or am I doing something wrong?

Question 2:

From Matt: I have some 10-in. wide 8/4 African Mahogany that I have been resawing into thinner boards.  I start by jointing one face then one edge and then resawing, usually down the middle. There is a good amount of tension in the boards, so after resawing they have a decent twist.  Do I need to let the boards re-acclimate before I re-joint and plane them, or can I do that immediately? Also, would I be better off not jointing the face and resawing to a center-line rather than using the bandsaw fence. It seems like a waste of time getting that face flat just so I can use the bandsaw fence.

  All Time Favorite Technique

Bob: Fixing a mistake and perfectly matching both the face grain and end grain. 

Ben: Using a sawbench to support the ramps when moving machinery off the back of a pickup truck

Mike: Using a bird-mouth joint to create dividers

Question 3:

From Matt (in Australia): I see many of the worlds best woodworkers only apply glue to one mating surface of a joint not both as advocated by Hoadley. When is it acceptable to only apply glue to one surface of a mating joint?

Question 4:

From Anthony: Last couple years I’ve been on the hunt for an 8” jointer and just recently I was able to secure a CL purchase on a 12” jointer that I’m pretty excited about. It’s a Bridgewood 12” 5hp that I picked up a few hours away from a now retired door maker. As with most home woodworkers, my jointing experience has been on a six inch jointer. What are the potential areas of concern with a larger jointer? In general, with a jointer, what leads up to an accident? Is it simply being unaware of your hands and proper use?

Recommendations:

Ben - David Johnson's Instagram Page

Bob - His own Instagram page

Mike - Go buy a fresh bottle of glue


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-178.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:31am EDT

For more information on The Florida School of Woodwork: http://www.schoolofwoodwork.com/

For more infomation on Fine Woodworking HANDS On 2019 in Tampa, February 1-3: http://bit.ly/2Pbh03U


Kate Swann is a lifetime woodworker, furnituremaker, and artist that known nation wide for her elegant custom furniture designs. Her unique works have been featured in magazines and act as functional furniture pieces in boardrooms, homes and retail spaces around the country. Renowned for her exquisite textural and surface embellishment work, Kate draws from her time spent wandering the globe as a shepherdess, outward bound instructor and translator. As the founder and director of the Florida School of Woodworking, she oversees the curriculum, and mission of the school. Her knowledge and skills come from many years of running Franklin St Fine Woodwork, a custom design/build company she co-founded over twenty years ago. Passionate about the artisanal crafts she works to inspire and motivate students to achieve new levels of accomplishment in the fine woodworking and to enjoy the value of incorporating artisanal work in their lives. We're excited to have the Florida School of Woodwork as the location for our first ever hands-on event, February 1-3, 2019. Fine Woodworking’s HANDS ON is a unique opportunity to expand your skills through personalized instruction from a diverse group of experts in an intimate setting.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-177.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:48am EDT

Question 1: From Matt: I have 3 questions about getting into kumiko: 1.) What (Japanese) chisel would you recommend starting with?

2.) What online/printed resources would you recommend?

3.) Any thoughts on preparing the strips without a tablesaw or drum sander? Question 2: From Martti: What is it in your preferred kumiko construction that ensures trouble-free cleanup over time for quite some years and decades? Segment: All Time Favorite Technique Ben - Loading magnets into a brass tube in order to keep the polarity correct

Mike - Sharpening a chisel to 20º-25º for paring end-grain on pine


Question 3: From Al: I am having some trouble laying out the pins and tales on the Wenge in the more traditional way, unlike  what Mike shows. Wenge is extremely hard and not at all forgiving and the grain tends to be a problem in scribing the wood. Perhaps this is why he choose to do this with the table saw and router methods.  Where can you get the table saw blade and the router bit to do it like Mike.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-177.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Leave a comment on this episode's show notes page to enter to win a one of three Shop Talk Live t-shirts! - http://bit.ly/2JzIJZb

Question 1:

From Damon: It’s time for me to start surfacing rough boards, but I don’t have the money to buy BOTH a jointer and a planer. I do have a plan for milling stock without the jointer, please let me know what you think:

  1. Buy a lunchbox planer and build a sled for face jointing
  2. Build a jig for ripping a straight edge at the tablesaw
  3. After face jointing with the sled and then planing the stock to thickness, the plan is to a rip a straight edge on my table using the jig and then ripping to width using the fence.          

Do you know of a better way to mill to four square without a jointer?

Question 2:

From Granary: What are your thoughts on resawing at the tablesaw? I'm terrified of it, but was recently and reluctantly exposed to it as a method for expediting the process at the shop. But, as an intermediate woodworker, I can only see downsides to resawing at the tablesaw. While taking a class, after resawing a few times at the tablesaw, I had to request that I not do it. I felt like a total wuss, but at the same time, when I was holding the stock, and the saw was running, I just felt like it was going to go wrong.

Segment: All Time Favorite Technique

Anissa: Gluing on clamping blocks for miters

Ben: Using CA glue to glue a piece to an backer board in order to plane it thinner than 1/4-in.

Mike: Using shims to perfectly offset a piece


Question 3: Esoteric lumber questions!

From Craig: Needed some 16/4 ash stock for table legs. At my local lumberyard, I selected from a bin that contained a mix of flat, riff and quarter sawn boards, I pulled what I’d thought was an ideal piece, had the yard guy write up the tag, and then proceeded to the office. I noticed on the tag that the width of my selection was ~ 12/4. I suggested that I should pay the price for 12/4, rather than 16/4, but they were unpersuaded. It was foolish of me to suggest this, as at this yard the invisible sign on the wall reads “The customer is always wrong”

Love the show; Anissa “Long Pause” Kapsales is a nice addition

From Cameron: When breaking down a larger board do you prefer long or wide off cuts?  After listening to the pod for years now I’m obsessed with getting the best grain selection but don’t want to waste a whole board to get one piece.

As an example, I have a board that is 8-in. wide and 4-ft. long. From that I need piece that is 3-in. By 8-in. The best piece is on the edge of the board, 6-in. from the end.  

 


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-176.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Just a test, nothing to see here

Category:general -- posted at: 11:44am EDT

Head over to ShopTalkLive.com and leave a comment on this episode's show-notes page for your chance to win a one-year membership to Fine Woodworking's new UNLIMITED membership! We’ll pick a winner November 9, 2018.

Make sure you check out The Craft of Veneering  by Craig Thibodeau

Question 1:

From Tom: I am building a credenza that will be 84" long, with solid walnut top and bottom. If the back is made of plywood (1/2" or 3/4"), is it ok to glue the back to the solid top and bottom pieces, or will differential wood movement cause this joint to fail?

Question 2:

From Ron: What are your opinions on the various panel clamps available (ie Damstom) and are any worth buying?   In most of your videos/articles I see shop made wooden cauls and lots of bar clamps, but I’m looking for a less stressful way since I struggle to keep things flat as I rush to get clamps on before the glue sets up.

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool

Ben: Sharpening stone box

Mike: Associate editor, Barry Dima, because he's a kiss up and gave him a set of dividers

Tom: Small hammer he STOLE from the FWW shop

Question 3:

From Craig: I am going to build Garrett Hack's huntboard from issue #187. One thing I am unsure of is how to attach the drawer runners. The only thing shown in the text and plan is that they are tenoned at the front to the rails, with no mention of the back. They can't be mortised into the back panel like the kickers due to the assembly order, and simply gluing them to the sides would lead to cross grain gluing issues. I've thought of a couple ways I could attach them, one being sitting on cleats attached to the case back, or screwed into the side partitions with elongated holes. Do you guys have any thoughts or know how Garrett secured these pieces?

 


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-175.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content.

Start your free two week trial here.

Show notes are available here.

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking.

Links mentioned in this episode:

An Edge-Jointing Primer - Well-tuned tools and the right technique create joints that last by Gary Rogowski #124–May/June 1997 Issue

Creating an Attractive Tabletop, Part 2 Edge-jointing and glue-up by Bob Van Dyke #208–Nov/Dec 2009 Issue

No Black Line Veneer

How to add splines for stronger miters - Quick jig produces clean joints with hidden power - by Doug Stowe #268–May/June 2018 Issue 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-174.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:20am EDT

Show notes

Links mentioned in this episode:

Wood Planes Made Easy by David Finck #196–Jan/Feb 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QU8Ui9

 

Handwork: Make a coopering plane by Clark Kellogg #263-Sep/Oct 2017 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QVs9YP

 

James Krenov on Handplanes by James Krenov #196–Jan/Feb 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QTT5YS

 

Get to Know Japanese Handplanes by Andrew Hunter #260–Mar/Apr 2017 Issue - http://bit.ly/2wY5Mfg

 

Japanese Planes Demystified by Carl Swensson #145–Nov/Dec 2000 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QRCHrM

 

Soundproof a Basement Shop by Mark Corke #167–Tools & Shops 2003 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QQRQd3

 

Mike Farrington on YouTube - http://bit.ly/2QXRWPT

 

Dorian Bracht on YouTube - http://bit.ly/2QXQtsR

 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-173.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:05am EDT

Sign up now for your chance to win the Ultimate Router Table Giveaway from Fine Woodworking and JessEm Tool Company

Links discussed in this episode:

Sanding on the Drill Press - by Michael Fortune #254–May/June 2016 Issue

Arts & Crafts Bed by Kevin Rodel #260–Mar/Apr 2017 Issue 

Contemporary Arts and Crafts Bed by Michael Cullen #268–May/June 

Emmet Van Driesche - Spoon blanks for sale

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-172.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:29am EDT

To enter to win a USB archive leave a comment on the show notes page for this episode. Winner will be selected September 14, 2018

Sharpening Services – Is it worth the time and expense to get your blades sharpened?

Video: Machine Setup – The Jointer part 1 – Matt Wajda sets the jointer tables using only a straight-edge and some scraps of paper

Finish Line: Original Arts and Crafts by Nancy R. Hiller #193–Sept/Oct 2007 Issue

Re-creating a Shaker Finish by Linda Coit #203–Jan/Feb 2009 Issue

Video Workshop: Mike fumes the white oak of his hayrake table

Video: How to Fume Furniture with Ammonia by Kelly J. Dunton #186–Sept/Oct 2006 Issue

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-171.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Show Notes: http://bit.ly/2JzIJZb

Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

 

Links mentioned:

Video: Accurate Biscuit Joints by Tony O'Malley #165–Sept/Oct 2003 Issue

 

Fine Furniture with Biscuit Joints by Michael Fortune #227–July/Aug 2012 Issue

 

Hall Table with Flair by Jennifer Anderson #236–Nov/Dec 2013 Issue

 

Display Cabinet, the Krenov Way by Jim Budlong #208–Nov/Dec 2009 Issue

 

Mid-Century Credenza by Libby Schrum #261–May/June 2017 Issue

 

Get perfect reveals with a Domino by Anissa Kapsales #261–May/June 2017 Issue

 

How to Tame Tricky Glue-Ups by Michael Fortune #243–Nov/Dec 2014 Issue


How to Make a Mallet by Michael Cullen #230–Tools & Shops 2013 Issue

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-170-2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:40am EDT

We were going to put this interview in the last episode, but it deserved to have your undivided attention. So here is a special bonus episode of Shop Talk Live.

For more information on The Maplewoodshop program: https://www.maplewoodshop.com/

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-169.5_Bonus.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:53pm EDT

Show notes: http://bit.ly/2JzIJZb

Chris Becksvoort, the dovetail master at work by Christian Becksvoort, Ben Strano #264-Nov/Dec 2017 Issue - http://bit.ly/2M5heMI

Architectural Wall Cabinet by Nancy R. Hiller #270–Sep/Oct 2018 Issue -http://bit.ly/2LWq1QU

An Elegant, Contemporary DeskAn Elegant, Contemporary Desk by Michael Robbins #270–Sep/Oct 2018 Issue -http://bit.ly/2M0LmII

Scaling Furniture from Photos by Miguel Gómez-Ibáñez #170–May/June 2004 Issue - http://bit.ly/2LWtKhk

Resize. Don’t Redraw. – Dave Richards totally changes the scale of a piece in an efficient manner by David Richards - http://bit.ly/2vfRWlg

 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-169.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:09am EDT

Mike, Matt, and Ben answer 14 questions in another lightning round
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-168.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Mike, Matt, and Ben discuss glue-ups, premium vs. not-so-premium chisels, clogged handplanes, and milling lumber

Show-notes: http://bit.ly/2KQ2AF3

Links mentioned in the show:

If you have questions you’d like us to answer on the show, send them in to shoptalk@taunton.com. You can also use the voice memo app on your phone and email us a 30 second audio recording, or if you’re old-school you can leave a voicemail by calling 203-304-3456. 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-167.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:36am EDT

Enter for your chance to win the Fine Woodworking SawStop Professional Cabinet Saw Giveaway - http://bit.ly/2HrUK1N
 
Matt, Anissa, and Ben discuss tablesaw safety, working with round parts, drawbore joinery, wood movement, and their all-time favorite articles
Show notes are available at http://www.ShopTalkLive.com
 
Articles discussed in this episode:
 
Drawbored Tenons by Steve Latta #241–July/Aug 2014 Issue - http://bit.ly/2K9mFWz
 
Understanding Wood Movement by Christian Becksvoort #165–Sept/Oct 2003 Issue - http://bit.ly/2IdHNZN
 
Five Essential Bandsaw Jigs by Michael Fortune #180–Nov/Dev 2005 Issue - http://bit.ly/2K96xo7
 
Greatest Commission Ever? by Jonathan Binzen #198–May/June 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2K872i4
 
ARK Shark Guard from Leeway Workshop – A riving knife for old cabinet saws by Matt Kenney - http://bit.ly/2K4q7BL
 
 
Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl
For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0
To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh
Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-166.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Enter for your chance to win the Fine Woodworking SawStop Professional Cabinet Saw Giveaway - http://bit.ly/2HrUK1N

Show notes: http://bit.ly/2Ls18c1

Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl
For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Links from the show:

Make a Table from a Board by Michael Pekovich #243–Nov/Dec 2014 Issue - http://bit.ly/2sHpRkw
Video Workshop: Single Board Side Table by Michael Pekovich - http://bit.ly/2Hqu8yf

Left-Tilt vs. Right-Tilt Tablesaws by Hendrik Varju #191–May/June 2007 Issue - http://bit.ly/2sKYvKt

Tablesaw Kickback by Kelly Mehler #116–Jan/Feb 1996 Issue - http://bit.ly/2sKYPsF
Video: The Mighty DIY Push Stick by Ellen Kaspern #265–Tools & Shops 2018 Issue - http://bit.ly/2sJ30Fq
Push pads that actually work. Are you ready? by Rollie Johnson - http://bit.ly/2sKTNMJ

Build a Prairie Settle by Kevin Rodel #199–July/Aug 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2HqVlkq

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-165.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Mike, Matt, and Ben discuss jointer setup, bad bandsaw blades, plywood workbenches, and Japanese chisels and their all-time favorite techniques

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-164.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:40am EDT

Mike, Anissa, and Ben discuss Christian Becksvoort dovetailing, Mike then chaldovetail jigs, card scrapers, half-mortise locks, and Anissa admits to an epic smooth move

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-163.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:39am EDT

Show notes: http://bit.ly/2HCvQxD

This episode was sponsored by Titebond: http://www.titebond.com/

Check out MM Wood Studio's experience at FWW Live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwvx3FRkkl4

For more information about Rikon's turning system: http://bit.ly/2HyVEut

Become a member today and get instant access to all FineWoodworking.com content. Start your free two week trial here: http://bit.ly/2m576Fl

For more Shop Talk Live or to submit a question: http://bit.ly/2mVJYd0

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking: http://bit.ly/2newDLh

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-162.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:45am EDT

In a futile attempt to empty the inbox, Mike, Matt, and Ben blaze through 14 questions in this special quick-fire episode

Full show notes are available here: http://bit.ly/2qu9xUc

This episode is sponsored by Titebond:

Even if you’re not a professional woodworker, you want to use the glue the pros use.  And three out of four pro woodworkers trust Titebond as their choice. For building wood furniture or cabinets to making picture frames or birdhouses, or just general repairs around the house, Titebond has the widest choice of glues to help with whatever project you want to tackle. Titebond – the right glue for your next project.

For more information, visit titebond.com or seem them on Facebook and Instagram.

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Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-161.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:34am EDT

Plus, dealing with a warped panel, keeping tabletops from moving, the safety of spalted wood, and a snippet from our interview with Brian Boggs

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-160.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:38pm EDT

Handplanes that don't hold adjustments, dull bandsaw blades, 6-in. vs. 8-in. jointers, favorite tools, and the reign of Ben begins

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-159.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:05am EDT

Plus, bandsaw tables, mitered shooting boards, smooth moves, philosophical woodworking questions, glass disk sharpening systems, and pencil vs. knife

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-158.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00am EDT

Bandsaw speed settings, mitered rips by hand, cabinet scrapers, crosscut sleds, sliding dovetails, and all-time favorite articles and tools

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-157.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

Plus, choosing stock for a desktop, sanding techniques for turning, chopping through mortises, favorite techniques, and a preview of Tom's interview with Gary Rogowski

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-156.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:13am EDT

Plus, ways to live without a jointer, bullnose bits, evening out color in sapele, favorite tools, and smooth moves

 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-155.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:34am EDT

Plus, the guys discuss drawer and door reveals, shellac flakes, panel saws, shop layout, flattening chisels, and their all-time favorite articles

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-154.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:23am EDT

Fine Homebuilding editor Justin Fink comes in to discuss shop heating, moving a post, shop floors, walling in utilities, and all time favorite shops of all time

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-153.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about deciding what to build, Japanese vs Western style saws, favorite techniques, and what you should add to your holiday wishlist

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-152.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about planing veneer, jointing long boards, angled tenons, honing guides, and philosophical woodworking questions

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-151.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about outfeed tables, bandsaw drift, veneer thickness, and cross grain glue-ups

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-150.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:10pm EDT

Plus, the guys talk about migrating sawdust staining the surrounding wood, shoulder planes, green wood, and they take a deep dive on drawer fitting

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-149-edit.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:54am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about the new issue, curved scrapers, prefinishing dos and don't, milling lumber for a workbench top, and dive into what perfection means

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-148.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:24am EDT

Plus, alternatives to taking woodworking classes, routing circle cut-outs, glue line creeping, favorite tools, and smooth moves

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-147.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:03am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about drawer reveals, finishing cutting boards, all time favorite techniques and their newest smooth moves

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-146.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:59am EDT

This episode of Shop Talk Live is sponsored by Audible.

Head over to Audible.com/ShopTalkLive to get a free audio book.

04:50 - Question 1: 

I have a 400/1000 grit combination diamond stone, a high quality honing guide, and a leather strop. People always talk about removing the burr on the back of the blade after sharpening. I try to do that, but it seems to just bend back around and doesn't come off. I end up with a tiny sliver of iron on the end of my blade which is not straight and that I can bend with my finger. Why is this happening, what am I doing wrong?

-Theo

 

11:00 - Question 2:

Is there a maximum board width you are comfortable gluing up for a table top? I've heard that wider boards that are ripped down somewhat are more stable in the long run. I'm using some hickory for my top, and the boards will be around 10" wide following stock prep. I'd prefer not to rip them down.

-Eric

16:45 - All Time Favorite Tool of All Time... for this week:

Mike - Clamping cauls

Mike Pekovich: Arts and Crafts on Display
Ian Kirby: Gluing Up
Michael Fortune: How to Tame Tricky Glue-Ups

Ben - Lie Nielsen - Boggs curved spokeshave

 

37:50 - Question 3:

I recently made my first shooting board and modeled it after Mike’s shooting board with the sliding speed square for miters. My fence is dead square, checked with multiple hardware store squares but my cuts have yet to yield a square result. The consistent result is a cut that is high on the fence side of the board. After squaring and re-squaring many times I am at a loss. What am I doing wrong?

-Wes

Mike Pekovich: 6 Essential Bench Jigs
Video: Mike Pekovich’s Go-To Work Holding Jigs

46:20 - Ben's Audible recomendation:

Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman
By Peter Korn
Narrated by: Trabber Burns

Head over to Audible.com/ShopTalkLive to get a free audio book.

52:10 - Question 4:

A few months ago, I made a small side table out of cherry for my wife.  The table came out great but I’ve noticed in the past weeks that the glue line has turned into an obnoxious orange color.  The table has sat in indirect sunlight since finished.  The dowels have a “starburst” effect of glue around them and the glue line between the boards in the panel are now clearly visible.  I was wondering if you’d ever experienced this.  I had thought I’d sanded enough to remove any residual glue but perhaps not.  Now that the project has been finished with Arm-R-Seal, would it work to sand off the finish to remove the glue marks and then re-finish it?  In the end, I’d like to make this project look great again.  Any thoughts would be most helpful.  Thanks for your time. 

- Daniel

56:00 - All Time Favorite Technique of All Time... for this week

Ben - Using a finder of a glove to seal your squeeze bottle of finish

Mike - Breaking up a complicated glue up into multiple parts

1:02:30 - Question 5:

When sharpening chisels, do you put a micro bevel on them or just a standard 25 degree?  

-Richard

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-145.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:19am EDT

Plus, Ben, Matt, and Anissa discuss their favorite furniture makers, rules for the shop, All Time Favorite Tools and FWW Articles

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-144.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about dovetail spacing, hollow-chisel mortiser techniques, bucket-list furniture, smooth moves, and introduce a new segment taking a deep dive into surface prep

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-143.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:48am EDT

The guys are in Vegas and get to chat with skills advocate John Ratzenberger. Rollie Johnson joins and helps answer questions about secondary woods, having logs milled, and grinding on the cheap. 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-142-2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:42pm EDT

Vic Tesolin stops by to talk tools and tool bombs, plus the guys talk about splash-and-go sharpening stones, inexpensive vises, fretsaws, shaping curved legs, tool cabinets, and their all-time favorite woodworking books of all time… for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-141.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

With Ben filling in for Tom, and Anissa Kapsales filling in for Matt, the group confesses smooth moves, discusses mortising options, intermediate projects, router tables, flattening cupped boards, and woodworking revelations. Plus, Mike is accused of being a bit cheeky with this all-time favorite technique.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-140.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:40am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about how they make drawer stock, tablesaw horsepower, roll around carts, and making a miter sled for a benchtop saw

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-139.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:44pm EDT

Plus, the guys debate working from plans vs. improvising, how much stock to leave when milling, all time favorite techniques, and some recent tool bombs

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-138.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about attributes of a good woodworking student, picking the right wood for a project, and their all time favorite furniture and techniques 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-137.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:14am EDT

A special episode recorded live from Fine Woodworking Live 2017, featuring guests Peter Follansbee, Vic Tesolin, Joshua Klein, Joe Taylor, and Wilbur Pan

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-136.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:00am EDT

Plus, the guys talk about finishing drawer sides, planing curly maple, and all-time favorite techniques and tools. They also answer an age-old question: How important is a fore plane?

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-135.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:45am EDT

Plus, storing handplanes, swapping motors on a dangerous jointer, all time favorite techniques, furniture, and a listener asks the question, why does my plank stank? 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-134.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:36am EDT

Which bandsaw blades do you really need? Waterstones: to soak or not to soak. Plus all time favorite techniques and tools (hint: Matt has discovered tape, but it’s not blue!).

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-133.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:12am EDT

Advice for putting together a hand-tool kit, and some solid advice on picking hammers and mallets for woodworking. Plus, a question about contrast and smooth moves and favorite furniture.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-132.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:58am EDT

STL 131: Leg vise lowdown and favorite techniques

Plus the guys talk about keeping stains off workpieces, drill-press mortising attachments, grain direction on tabletops, and Ben makes everyone squirm with one of his favorites.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-131.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:04am EDT

STL 130: Workbench advice and waterfall joinery

Bench tips for a fledgling woodworker. Plus a call for help, and update on SawStop vs. Bosch, and our all time favorite furniture and tools.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-130.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:23am EDT

STL 129: Vise advice and shipping tips

Using a cast-iron vise as an end vise, tips on shipping furniture safely, and  Matt is haunted by saw diapers. Plus smooth moves and all-time favorite articles.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-129.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:42am EDT

STL 128: Favorite chisels and rusty tools

Plus, the guys talk about their favorite furniture of all time, all time techniques, crusty finishes, and the all important question — does your tablesaw need a diaper?

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-128.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:50am EDT

STL 127: Smooth moves and workbench woes

Ben fills in for Tom and the guys talk about milling lumber, what they love and loathe about their workbenches, what to do with reclaimed lumber, and which block plane Willie HG should buy

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-127.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:12am EDT

STL126: Brian Boggs reveals his ninja secrets

The guys talk about tool storage, sharpening stone purchases, and their all time favorite techniques... for this week. Plus a great interview with Brian Boggs about design, becoming a pro, and crazy bandsaw techniques. 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-126.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:09am EDT

Mike’s masterful moment on (web) TV. Plus the guys talk about nontoxic finishes and reveal their all-time favorite techniques and FWW articles of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-125.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:26am EDT

STL 124: Rollie Johnson talks bandsaw blades

Rollie Johnson talks about his new blog and talks about choosing bandsaw blades. Plus hand-tool tricks for rabbets and favorite techniques and tools.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-124.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:42am EDT

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-123.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:41am EDT

Favorite techniques, including Matt’s method of hiding splines in miters. What nail guns you need, fixing punky patches on spalted maple, and favorite furniture of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-122.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:27am EDT

The low-down on prefinishing parts, and the perfect finish for tools and drawer runners. Plus, Matt expresses his adoration for the Domino, and Mike has some tips for through-tenons.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-121.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:18am EDT

IWF: Tom’s cabinet blunder and other smooth moves. Plus we roll out some new segments: stats and surprise questions. Will they make the cut?

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-120.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:42am EDT

IWF: What happened Atlanta did not stay in Atlanta. How to fix a wax headache, and the best approach to angling a mortise for a wedged tenon. Plus all-time favorite articles, and a shocking revelation as Matt admits that Ben was right!

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-119.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:08am EDT

STL 118: Dovetail tips and favorite techniques

Highlights from Matt’s appearance on The Highland Woodworker show.  Handsaw buying advice. Plus the guys share tips on half-blind dovetails and their all-time favorite techniques of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-118.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:00am EDT

STL 117: Catching up with Gary Rogowski

We get the lowdown on Gary Rogowski's mentoring program for high-school woodworkers. Plus, what's up with the new magazine cover design? And our all-time favorite tools of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-117.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:52am EDT

STL 116: Fine Woodworking Live returns

Tom chats a bit about Fine Woodworking Live, which is making a comeback in 2017. Plus favorite furniture and a new segment, All Time Favorite Article of All Time... for This Week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-116.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:38am EDT

STL 115: Crotch walnut by another name

With Tom on vacation Ben fills in as host. Mike and Matt argue cast iron vs. bronze, miter saw specs, and whether Mike actually works on his cars or not.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-115.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:13am EDT

STL 114: Matt turns the tables on Ben’s tool bomb

Get better results with a card scraper and some paste wax tips. Plus favorite furniture and tools, and the down-low on calculating the load-bearing strength of wood for projects (hint: ditch the calculator).

*Web Producer's Note - Apoligies to the 765 people who downloaded the podcast in the first two hours it was up. I had an audio issue and you were hearing two Matt's after 15 minutes. The problem is fixed and a new file is ready for you to download. Apologie

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-114v3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:18am EDT

STL 113: Tool bomb, or not tool bomb?

Matt schools Ben in the art of the tool bomb, and Tom has a senior moment. Plus, converting a jack to a scrub, cedar balls to the rescue, and a rust surprise under the cherry scraps.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-113.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am EDT

STL 112: Someone spelched, and Matt doesn’t like it

Matt lays down the law on spelching in the shop. Plus super glues for woodworking, when to save scraps, and favorite furniture and tools of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-112.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:14am EDT

STL 111: Get to know Garrett Hack better

Garrett Hack replaces Mike... for this week. Plus left- vs. right-handed benches, advice on flattening blades, and finally, the big question: can you straighten wood with steam?

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-111.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:55pm EDT

STL 110: Those sexy shapton stones

Saw sharpening, smooth moves and the merits of a longer sanding block. The guys cover it all and it even gets a little steamy (and awkward) in the room.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-110.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:56am EDT

STL 109: Machine mayhem and explosive shellac

Tom gets a shellac surprise. Plus the fix for a funky jointer, replacing a tablesaw with a bandsaw, and All-Time Favorite Furniture and Tools of all time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-109.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:05am EDT

STL 108: Matt Kenney has left the building

Ben Strano mans Matt’s snark chair and attempts to resist its devilish power. Plus, can a cheap handplane do good work? Can, and should, you build a period piece with the Domino?

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-108.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:06am EDT

STL 107: Tips Master, Jim Richey

The guys talk about their all-time favorite Methods of Work of all time, this week. Plus, an interview with Jim Richey, the man who made Methods of Work.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-107.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:13am EDT

STL 106: Charles Brock, host of The Highland Woodworker web TV

The guys talk to Charles about the new partnership between Fine Woodworking and his show. Plus, tips on chisel sharpening, using undermount drawer slides, and moving big machines. Plus, our All Time Favorite Furniture of All Time... for this week.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-106.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

STL 105: Why We Build What We Build

The guys talk about inspiration and what they like to build and reveal their all-time favorite tool of all time... this week. Plus reader questions on scrapers, joinery, and the changing color of wood.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-105.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am EDT

Clark Kellogg  talks about the schools of Krenov and Korn and how they affected his woodworking career, plus the zen of letter-carving, and why he’s so popular on Instagram.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-104.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:05pm EDT

In our new “all-time favorite” segment, the guys talk about furniture designs they like.  Plus, how to hang a saw, the cure for wonky concrete floors,  and buying advice for machinery—when bigger is better.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-103.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:24am EDT

STL 102: The new guy from Nashville

Ben Strano, the new web guy, is in the house. Combo machine or separate jointer and planer? Plus wood and fire don’t mix, affordable spray options, and sharpening twist bits—NOT.

Direct download: STL_102__The_new_guy_from_Nashville.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:11am EDT

STL 101: Cherry is No Substitute for White Oak

Mike extolls the virtues of quartersawn white oak in Arts and Crafts work. Plus the guys reveal their New Year’s woodworking resolutions and chat about how to keep warm in a winter shop.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-101.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:56am EDT

STL 100: Matt is out of control, plus a mystery guest

It’s our 100th episode, with a special guest to celebrate. Plus we interview new contributing editor Chris Gochnour. Also, we chat up our favorite dovetail methods, and Matt gets a talkin’ to.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-100.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:37am EDT

STL 99: Waterstone Detectives

Woodworking sleuths solve the case of the unmarked waterstones. Plus a planing sled for small parts, tips for wheeled workbenches, fixes for resaw wrongs, and more boneheaded smooth moves.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-99.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:32pm EDT

STL 98: Mike’s Stick Trick, and the Fabric of Matt

Rust-prevention advice for a reader readying to move his shop. Matt shows his eye for fashion with fabric-lined boxes. Plus Mike chats about his stick trick, and Tom comes to terms with a drawknife.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-98.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:50pm EDT