Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Question 1:

From Tony:

We hear so much talk about  Lie Nielsen, Veritas, and Stanley hand planes but, I have a Millers Falls No. 8 that i picked up from an Antique store, that works really well. I don't think I’ve ever heard the Millers Falls Name be mentioned on the Podcast, so I am wondering if they’re any good? They seem to have been in contention with Stanley and they are American made from New England no less, since 1868!

Question 2:

From Matt:

I have been wanting to do a project using drawbore mortise and tenon joints. Is it a bad idea to attempt this type of joint in a softer woods like cherry or walnut, rather than oak.

Segment: Smooth Move

  • Mike - Forgetting that someone commissioned something from him, not those he looks up to
  • Barry - Making a mistake on a piece, remaking the piece, then accidentally using the mistake on the final piece
  • Ben - Trying to get away with not making a proper sled and accidentally dropping a piece on the tablesaw blade

Question 3:

From Bob: Can someone explain the difference between a scrub plane and a smooth plane? They seem similar in size and construction.

Question 4:

From Phillip:

I am looking to build a dining room table to a friend of mine, and am wondering what type of wood would be best to use. I have narrowed it down to White Oak, Cherry, and Walnut. The friend that I am making this for is a military man, and so gets stationed at different bases around the country every few years. My main concern is the table warping or splitting due to the drastic location and environmental changes that he will come across. Obviously, being a dining room table it also must be sturdy and not be too prone to scratches, dings, etc. White Oak is very wear resistant, but has a medium-high shrinkage value. Cherry is pretty stable once dried, but is softer and may get more dings. Walnut seems to be the middle road, being harder and less susceptible to scratches than Cherry but less likely to shrink/warp than White Oak.

What type of wood would you suggest that is going to be resistant to scratches and dings, yet won't warp or split in drastic climate changes? 

Recommendations:

Barry - Dedicated Shop Shoes
Ben - Chris Thile's Thank You, New York"
Mike - Tom Waits' album Swordfish Trombones


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-179.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:58am EST

To enter to win Bob Van Dyke's sharpening box from issue #254:

  1. Leave a comment on this episode's show-notes page
  2. Head over to the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking site and sign up for their email list

We’ll pick a winner December 21, 2018.

Question 1:

From Amy: I've been using a piece of vegetable tanned leather with green waxy honing compound as a strop. I start by rubbing compound onto the shiny side of the leather. However, when I go to strop my carving knives, the pressure from my blade compresses the compound and it flakes off. Is there something wrong with my compound, or am I doing something wrong?

Question 2:

From Matt: I have some 10-in. wide 8/4 African Mahogany that I have been resawing into thinner boards.  I start by jointing one face then one edge and then resawing, usually down the middle. There is a good amount of tension in the boards, so after resawing they have a decent twist.  Do I need to let the boards re-acclimate before I re-joint and plane them, or can I do that immediately? Also, would I be better off not jointing the face and resawing to a center-line rather than using the bandsaw fence. It seems like a waste of time getting that face flat just so I can use the bandsaw fence.

  All Time Favorite Technique

Bob: Fixing a mistake and perfectly matching both the face grain and end grain. 

Ben: Using a sawbench to support the ramps when moving machinery off the back of a pickup truck

Mike: Using a bird-mouth joint to create dividers

Question 3:

From Matt (in Australia): I see many of the worlds best woodworkers only apply glue to one mating surface of a joint not both as advocated by Hoadley. When is it acceptable to only apply glue to one surface of a mating joint?

Question 4:

From Anthony: Last couple years I’ve been on the hunt for an 8” jointer and just recently I was able to secure a CL purchase on a 12” jointer that I’m pretty excited about. It’s a Bridgewood 12” 5hp that I picked up a few hours away from a now retired door maker. As with most home woodworkers, my jointing experience has been on a six inch jointer. What are the potential areas of concern with a larger jointer? In general, with a jointer, what leads up to an accident? Is it simply being unaware of your hands and proper use?

Recommendations:

Ben - David Johnson's Instagram Page

Bob - His own Instagram page

Mike - Go buy a fresh bottle of glue


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-178.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:31am EST

For more information on The Florida School of Woodwork: http://www.schoolofwoodwork.com/

For more infomation on Fine Woodworking HANDS On 2019 in Tampa, February 1-3: http://bit.ly/2Pbh03U


Kate Swann is a lifetime woodworker, furnituremaker, and artist that known nation wide for her elegant custom furniture designs. Her unique works have been featured in magazines and act as functional furniture pieces in boardrooms, homes and retail spaces around the country. Renowned for her exquisite textural and surface embellishment work, Kate draws from her time spent wandering the globe as a shepherdess, outward bound instructor and translator. As the founder and director of the Florida School of Woodworking, she oversees the curriculum, and mission of the school. Her knowledge and skills come from many years of running Franklin St Fine Woodwork, a custom design/build company she co-founded over twenty years ago. Passionate about the artisanal crafts she works to inspire and motivate students to achieve new levels of accomplishment in the fine woodworking and to enjoy the value of incorporating artisanal work in their lives. We're excited to have the Florida School of Woodwork as the location for our first ever hands-on event, February 1-3, 2019. Fine Woodworking’s HANDS ON is a unique opportunity to expand your skills through personalized instruction from a diverse group of experts in an intimate setting.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.  

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-177.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:48am EST

Question 1: From Matt: I have 3 questions about getting into kumiko: 1.) What (Japanese) chisel would you recommend starting with?

2.) What online/printed resources would you recommend?

3.) Any thoughts on preparing the strips without a tablesaw or drum sander? Question 2: From Martti: What is it in your preferred kumiko construction that ensures trouble-free cleanup over time for quite some years and decades? Segment: All Time Favorite Technique Ben - Loading magnets into a brass tube in order to keep the polarity correct

Mike - Sharpening a chisel to 20º-25º for paring end-grain on pine


Question 3: From Al: I am having some trouble laying out the pins and tales on the Wenge in the more traditional way, unlike  what Mike shows. Wenge is extremely hard and not at all forgiving and the grain tends to be a problem in scribing the wood. Perhaps this is why he choose to do this with the table saw and router methods.  Where can you get the table saw blade and the router bit to do it like Mike.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-177.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

Leave a comment on this episode's show notes page to enter to win a one of three Shop Talk Live t-shirts! - http://bit.ly/2JzIJZb

Question 1:

From Damon: It’s time for me to start surfacing rough boards, but I don’t have the money to buy BOTH a jointer and a planer. I do have a plan for milling stock without the jointer, please let me know what you think:

  1. Buy a lunchbox planer and build a sled for face jointing
  2. Build a jig for ripping a straight edge at the tablesaw
  3. After face jointing with the sled and then planing the stock to thickness, the plan is to a rip a straight edge on my table using the jig and then ripping to width using the fence.          

Do you know of a better way to mill to four square without a jointer?

Question 2:

From Granary: What are your thoughts on resawing at the tablesaw? I'm terrified of it, but was recently and reluctantly exposed to it as a method for expediting the process at the shop. But, as an intermediate woodworker, I can only see downsides to resawing at the tablesaw. While taking a class, after resawing a few times at the tablesaw, I had to request that I not do it. I felt like a total wuss, but at the same time, when I was holding the stock, and the saw was running, I just felt like it was going to go wrong.

Segment: All Time Favorite Technique

Anissa: Gluing on clamping blocks for miters

Ben: Using CA glue to glue a piece to an backer board in order to plane it thinner than 1/4-in.

Mike: Using shims to perfectly offset a piece


Question 3: Esoteric lumber questions!

From Craig: Needed some 16/4 ash stock for table legs. At my local lumberyard, I selected from a bin that contained a mix of flat, riff and quarter sawn boards, I pulled what I’d thought was an ideal piece, had the yard guy write up the tag, and then proceeded to the office. I noticed on the tag that the width of my selection was ~ 12/4. I suggested that I should pay the price for 12/4, rather than 16/4, but they were unpersuaded. It was foolish of me to suggest this, as at this yard the invisible sign on the wall reads “The customer is always wrong”

Love the show; Anissa “Long Pause” Kapsales is a nice addition

From Cameron: When breaking down a larger board do you prefer long or wide off cuts?  After listening to the pod for years now I’m obsessed with getting the best grain selection but don’t want to waste a whole board to get one piece.

As an example, I have a board that is 8-in. wide and 4-ft. long. From that I need piece that is 3-in. By 8-in. The best piece is on the edge of the board, 6-in. from the end.  

 


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-176.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

Just a test, nothing to see here

Category:general -- posted at: 11:44am EST

Head over to ShopTalkLive.com and leave a comment on this episode's show-notes page for your chance to win a one-year membership to Fine Woodworking's new UNLIMITED membership! We’ll pick a winner November 9, 2018.

Make sure you check out The Craft of Veneering  by Craig Thibodeau

Question 1:

From Tom: I am building a credenza that will be 84" long, with solid walnut top and bottom. If the back is made of plywood (1/2" or 3/4"), is it ok to glue the back to the solid top and bottom pieces, or will differential wood movement cause this joint to fail?

Question 2:

From Ron: What are your opinions on the various panel clamps available (ie Damstom) and are any worth buying?   In most of your videos/articles I see shop made wooden cauls and lots of bar clamps, but I’m looking for a less stressful way since I struggle to keep things flat as I rush to get clamps on before the glue sets up.

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool

Ben: Sharpening stone box

Mike: Associate editor, Barry Dima, because he's a kiss up and gave him a set of dividers

Tom: Small hammer he STOLE from the FWW shop

Question 3:

From Craig: I am going to build Garrett Hack's huntboard from issue #187. One thing I am unsure of is how to attach the drawer runners. The only thing shown in the text and plan is that they are tenoned at the front to the rails, with no mention of the back. They can't be mortised into the back panel like the kickers due to the assembly order, and simply gluing them to the sides would lead to cross grain gluing issues. I've thought of a couple ways I could attach them, one being sitting on cleats attached to the case back, or screwed into the side partitions with elongated holes. Do you guys have any thoughts or know how Garrett secured these pieces?

 


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-175.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

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Show notes are available here.

To see the newest issue of Fine Woodworking.

Links mentioned in this episode:

An Edge-Jointing Primer - Well-tuned tools and the right technique create joints that last by Gary Rogowski #124–May/June 1997 Issue

Creating an Attractive Tabletop, Part 2 Edge-jointing and glue-up by Bob Van Dyke #208–Nov/Dec 2009 Issue

No Black Line Veneer

How to add splines for stronger miters - Quick jig produces clean joints with hidden power - by Doug Stowe #268–May/June 2018 Issue 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-174.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:20am EST

Show notes

Links mentioned in this episode:

Wood Planes Made Easy by David Finck #196–Jan/Feb 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QU8Ui9

 

Handwork: Make a coopering plane by Clark Kellogg #263-Sep/Oct 2017 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QVs9YP

 

James Krenov on Handplanes by James Krenov #196–Jan/Feb 2008 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QTT5YS

 

Get to Know Japanese Handplanes by Andrew Hunter #260–Mar/Apr 2017 Issue - http://bit.ly/2wY5Mfg

 

Japanese Planes Demystified by Carl Swensson #145–Nov/Dec 2000 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QRCHrM

 

Soundproof a Basement Shop by Mark Corke #167–Tools & Shops 2003 Issue - http://bit.ly/2QQRQd3

 

Mike Farrington on YouTube - http://bit.ly/2QXRWPT

 

Dorian Bracht on YouTube - http://bit.ly/2QXQtsR

 

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-173.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:05am EST

Sign up now for your chance to win the Ultimate Router Table Giveaway from Fine Woodworking and JessEm Tool Company

Links discussed in this episode:

Sanding on the Drill Press - by Michael Fortune #254–May/June 2016 Issue

Arts & Crafts Bed by Kevin Rodel #260–Mar/Apr 2017 Issue 

Contemporary Arts and Crafts Bed by Michael Cullen #268–May/June 

Emmet Van Driesche - Spoon blanks for sale

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-172.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:29am EST