Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Leave a comment on this episodes show notes page to be entered in the giveaway of Craig Thibodeau's book, The Craft of Veneering.

 Peter Galbert’s FWW Live 2018 Keynote Speech - Unsurprisingly, the journey of a windsor chairmaker is rarely a straight line


 

Question 1:

From David: I have avoided cordless power tools because as a hobbyist and renter, I seldom use the tools outside of the basement workshop. I've been told I don't know what I'm missing, but it seems my wallet prefers it that way.  I'm most concerned about trying to commit to one brand/manufacturer or contend with the expense and hassle of having multiple chargers and batteries that aren't compatible. Do you feel as though it makes sense to keep all of your cordless power tools within the same brand? Or is my concern unfounded? If you had to commit to a brand, what would they be and why?

Question 2:

From Harry: How can I prevent Camellia from becoming all gummy. After letting a plane set for a few weeks that had been wiped down with Camellia Oil it was next to impossible to get the plane apart. I actually caused some minor damage it was stuck so hard.

Segment: Smooth Move Ben: Not looking at the fine print on a router bearing Anissa: Not looking at the sticker telling her which way to assemble a part on a dust collector


Question 3:  

From J: Hey folks, I recently volunteered to be the shop manager for my local guild of woodworkers.  We have a 16” Oliver that apparently, according to some, must never have its bed waxed. They prefer it is cleaned only with kerosene, the reason being that it’s believed waxing a jointer bed will cause glue joints to fail. Any merit to this train of thought? Or can I just wax it and make everyone’s lives easier.

  • Mike recommendation of TopCote is now called GlideCote
  • Ben uses and recommends SlipIt

Question 4:

From Joe: I’ve gotten very good at sharpening my hand plane blades as well as making my wood surface feel silky smooth off the hand plane.  When using a 2 pound cut shellac as a finish, do I need to rough up wood surface with sandpaper (such as 300 grit) so the shellac can stick better to the wood surface?


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-183.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:20pm EST

Normally here I post a bunch of links. I'm going to be honest, you just need one link on this, Craig's website. Everything he discusses is easily found on his website, and the site itself is wonderfully done. It's worth going to just to see how a real pro presents their work. Plus, while you're there you can buy a signed copy of his book! -Ben

https://ctfinefurniture.com/

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-182.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:48am EST

How Ben finished Mike's spoon - Finish Greenwood Spoons Like a Pro by Emmet Van Driesche

Question 1: From Fabian: I have a sliding table saw and struggle to convert all the jigs mentioned in the magazine to fit my saw. How would you attach for example a kumiko grid jig as used by Mike in the article "Spice up your work with kumiko" to the saw? Do I fasten it with bolts to the crosscut fence or just let it ride in the one miter slot in the sliding table? In either case it is just secured on the left side of the blade.

Question 2: From Chris: I'm on the lookout for a new paste wax solution. I'm totally over the petroleum smell of commercial options, and would love something simple with just a bit of luster to apply to my projects. Has Mike ever shared his recipe to attempt to recreate the non-longer-available Goddard's Cabinet Makers Wax? I never used the product in its original form, but I'm sold on his description of it. Something natural, simple, and lemon-scented sounds like the perfect solution for me.

Segment: All Time Favorite Tool of All Time… for this week Tom: Cabinet scraper and card scraper
Mike: Dead blow mallet to straighten his folded-back backsaw
Ben: ARK Shark Guard for his Delta Unisaw

Question 3:   From Josh: I see pictures posted online where people have gotten a completely mirror polished edge on a chisel or plane iron. I’m using a Norton 1000 water stone, followed by a King 3000, followed by a Norton 8000 stone. I can’t seem to get that mirror polish. I still end up with some scratches, no matter how long I work with the 8000 stone, even when honing a new blade. I know Mike recommends 1000/4000/8000, but Lie Nielsen skips the intermediate grit, so I don’t think the 3000 stone is my problem. I’ve thought about trying to get a finer stone than the 8000 I have, but I don’t want a $100 experiment.

Question 4: From Peter: The cement floor of my shop is unsealed and kind of wrecks my feet after a day in the shop. Keeping in mind that it’s a rental, do you have any recommendations for an affordable flooring option that may help my feet and also protect my equipment from the sludge that melts off my wife’s car? It needs to be solid enough that I can have my lathe on that won’t increase vibration.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-182.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

Check out our newest video workshop, Enfield Cupboard with Hand Tools featuring Chris Gochnour and be sure to help us make our video workshops even better by filling out this quick survey.

Question 1: From Dean: I have an enjoyable dilemma. I am building a garage with adjacent shop space at our north home.  The shop is 200 sq-ft, one third the size of my St. Paul shop, and thus creates a challenge adapting to a small space. I have been devouring all the FWW articles on small shops and believe I can make this space workable but I will have to make some concessions, mainly my tablesaw, jointer, and planer. Will I be satisfied and served by a portable, contractor-style table saw and a combination jointer-planer?  

Question 2: From Tanc: Is there a guideline for when stretchers are needed to strengthen a piece? I am looking to build an entryway table from oak that is 32-in. high, 60-in. long, 12-in. deep, with a  2 ½-in. apron and 2-in. legs that taper down to 1-in. I prefer simple designs, and would rather not have stretchers.

Ben's mockup of Tanc's table with the given dimensions:

Benside Table:

Segment: Smooth Moves

  • John: Not cleaning the lint off of a new floor finish applicator
  • Anissa: Touching a friends piece of furniture while the finish was still wet
  • Ben: Trusting a tool that should never have been trusted


Question 3:   When I set up my workshop, I positioned the bench facing a south-facing window and installed fluorescents directly above the bench at about eight feet above the floor. If I have a board on edge, any markings on the side facing my body are difficult to see because that area is in shadow. I want to avoid using task lights wherever possible, as they just get in the way. I'm thinking that more overhead lighting is the answer.  Do you have any thoughts about where this should be positioned to minimize shadow areas when working at the bench?

Question 4: From David: I am baffled that some ash stock I milled a couple months ago is now nearly impossible to plane. I cut and milled the ash for a small box a while ago. It was wonderful to work with and easy to plane. I put the pieces aside to enjoy the far too short Minnesota summer. I kept it in the same place all my wood stock lives; my basement workshop. I was looking forward to getting back to work on the box. I decided to plane all the pieces again, assuming it wouldn’t be flat and square as it was months ago. I was dumbfounded that it was nearly impossible to plane. I used the exact same plane I used originally. I ended up resharpening the blade twice and adjusted it to take the finest possible shaving. Still it would stick and chatter across the board and leave tear out in the middle of smooth grain. To make sure I wasn’t hallucinating, I tried planing some oak and some twisty walnut. It performed beautifully. It was as though it had developed a skin of steel in the time since I first milled it. Any ideas about what/why this happened?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-181.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

Check out our newest video workshop, Enfield Cupboard with Hand Tools featuring Chris Gochnour and be sure to help us make our video workshops even better by filling out this quick survey.

Question 1: From Dean: I have an enjoyable dilemma. I am building a garage with adjacent shop space at our north home.  The shop is 200 sq-ft, one third the size of my St. Paul shop, and thus creates a challenge adapting to a small space. I have been devouring all the FWW articles on small shops and believe I can make this space workable but I will have to make some concessions, mainly my tablesaw, jointer, and planer. Will I be satisfied and served by a portable, contractor-style table saw and a combination jointer-planer?  

Question 2: From Tanc: Is there a guideline for when stretchers are needed to strengthen a piece? I am looking to build an entryway table from oak that is 32-in. high, 60-in. long, 12-in. deep, with a  2 ½-in. apron and 2-in. legs that taper down to 1-in. I prefer simple designs, and would rather not have stretchers.

Ben's mockup of Tanc's table with the given dimensions:

Benside Table:

Segment: Smooth Moves

  • John: Not cleaning the lint off of a new floor finish applicator
  • Anissa: Touching a friends piece of furniture while the finish was still wet
  • Ben: Trusting a tool that should never have been trusted


Question 3:   When I set up my workshop, I positioned the bench facing a south-facing window and installed fluorescents directly above the bench at about eight feet above the floor. If I have a board on edge, any markings on the side facing my body are difficult to see because that area is in shadow. I want to avoid using task lights wherever possible, as they just get in the way. I'm thinking that more overhead lighting is the answer.  Do you have any thoughts about where this should be positioned to minimize shadow areas when working at the bench?

Question 4: From David: I am baffled that some ash stock I milled a couple months ago is now nearly impossible to plane. I cut and milled the ash for a small box a while ago. It was wonderful to work with and easy to plane. I put the pieces aside to enjoy the far too short Minnesota summer. I kept it in the same place all my wood stock lives; my basement workshop. I was looking forward to getting back to work on the box. I decided to plane all the pieces again, assuming it wouldn’t be flat and square as it was months ago. I was dumbfounded that it was nearly impossible to plane. I used the exact same plane I used originally. I ended up resharpening the blade twice and adjusted it to take the finest possible shaving. Still it would stick and chatter across the board and leave tear out in the middle of smooth grain. To make sure I wasn’t hallucinating, I tried planing some oak and some twisty walnut. It performed beautifully. It was as though it had developed a skin of steel in the time since I first milled it. Any ideas about what/why this happened?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-181.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:00am EST

Question 1: From Cameron: I’m thinking of making a bench inspired by Mark Edmundson’s “Modern Danish Cord Bench” from issue #194-Nov/Dec 2007. I’m want to stretch the width to 6’ to use at my 7’ table.  Will the front and rear rails be enough to support 4 well fed adults or will I have a hilarious story to tell for the next 30 year about the thanksgiving collapse of 2019?

Question 2: From Mark: I saw a video where Matt Wajda drew a tool chest, full scale by hand.  Is this a common method? I draw Architecture for a living, I am tired of drawing.  I’m not interested in SketchUp, I already spend way too much time with AutoCAD. Woodworking is my release. I completely understand that you can work issues out on paper long before you even touch a board.  I am curious about designing without drawing. Does anyone you know use a design process that does not involve drawing?

Segment: Shop Resolutions

  • Mike - Learn a new skill this year
  • Anissa - Draw every day
  • Ben - Finish working on his shop, and start working in his shop… by May

Question 3: From Andy: Any idea how to go about achieving the finish in the attached image? I’ve never seen a finish like this one that’s pretty vibrant, yet maintains the appearance of the grain. Is it just a watered down paint?

Question 4: From Bob: I have some Japanese chisels that I’m starting to use.  About 3/16” behind the edge of the blade is a cove. When you grind back to that cove, the back will no longer be flat.  Do you have to toss the chisel out at that point?


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-180.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EST

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