Shop Talk Live - Fine Woodworking

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna! The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II

Question 1: From Shawn: I’m working on a Christmas present for my sister.  It’s a hallway table with 2 drawers in cherry. This is the first piece I’ve made with cherry.  Some of the surfaces have a quarter sawn grain orientation and I’m finding them highly prone to tear out. My card scraper seems to be the only tool I’ve got that can tackle it, and even then I still have to pay really close attention to the changing grain direction. I’d like to hear any recommendations you might have about tools and techniques to deal with tear out, and also about other tear out prone woods you’ve worked with. I’ve found quarter sawn maple to be difficult as well.

Question 2: From Joe: To build a bed for my grandson I ordered 50 bd ft of rough lumber,  Black walnut. The wood was beautiful but this is where my confusion began. I got the job done but I don't know if I went about it the best way. The bed with headboard, frame, 6 drawers underneath, and footboard had over 100 pieces. All the lumber was about 8 inches wide and about 10 feet long. Is it better to mill the long boards and then layout all the parts, or layout the parts oversize and cut them out and send smaller pieces through the planer and jointer?

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool

Mike: 6-in. Combo Square
Bob: Stanley #4–Type 11
Ben: Lie Nielsen honing guide

Question 3:   From Mike: I’ve come to realize my jointer needs tuning, and i recall you guys saying how you set your outfeed table a hair lower than your cutter head. I can’t find the episode that contains this discussion, but i don’t recall there being any reasoning for this. I adjusted mine as y’all suggested but found this was causing the trailing ends of the boards to not touch the blades. After reading my powermatic manual, it says to have the outfeed table level with blade, so what’s up with your hack causing me this grief?

Recommendations:


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-185.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:30am EDT

Chris Schwarz is a furniture maker and writer who works from a German barroom built in 1896 in Covington, Ky. He is one of the founders of Lost Art Press, a book-publishing company that specializes in handwork, and Crucible Tool, a company that makes hand tools for woodwork. Chris is the author of several books, including Workbenches: From Design & Theory to Construction & Use (F+W Media), The Anarchist’s Tool Chest, Campaign Furniture, The Anarchist’s Design Book and Ingenious Mechanics (Lost Art Press). In addition to his publishing efforts, he builds casework and Welsh stick chairs for clients all over the world.

Chris' class at Fine Woodworking Live is titled: Compound-Angle Joinery, Minus the Math
Mastering compound angles typically means mastering trigonometry. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Compound angles can be measured, laid out, and cut without any math—or even numbers. Chris will show you the methods he uses for replicating unusual (sometimes radical) compound angles to build his Welsh stick chairs. The method requires just a wire clothes hanger, a sliding bevel, and a ruler. (Oh, and you’ll also need to bring an open mind.) The technique allows you to replicate compound angles from photos or drawings, or to create new designs using half-scale models (made with that clothes hanger).

Register now for Fine Woodworking Live 2019!

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna!

The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II
Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-184.5.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:13am EDT

Enter for your chance to win Fine Woodworking's Shop Giveaway: Upgrade to Laguna! The winner will receive a prize that includes:

  • 14|12 Bandsaw
  • F2 Fusion Tablesaw
  • 1 HP Dust Collector
  • REVO 12|16
  • 6″ Jointer ShearTec II 

Question 1:

From William: I live in Ohio where the Emerald Ash Borer is ravaging every ash tree around. With all these ash trees coming down and the infestation of the Ash Borer, are we looking at a future shortage of ash trees?  Should we, as woodworkers, stock up on quality ash boards while we can get them and while they're fairly inexpensive?

Question 2:

From Paul: I’ve started looking for a better sketchbook and am overwhelmed by the choices.  I’ve heard Mike talk about the books he uses, but I’ve never heard him mention the brand or “model” he favors.  On STL 155 he mentioned 60-80 lb paper, spiral bound, unruled, 6x9 size. Frankly, that limits it to about half a zillion options and it’s very hard to judge quality even touching the book at the local art supply place.  So please spill, Mike!

Segment: All-Time Favorite Tool

Question 3:  

From Caleb: I'm wondering if any of you have used a hollow chisel mortiser as a drill press? Is this a viable way to get around buying a drill press?

Question 4:

From Chris: What books inspire you to get out to your shop and build something? Any favorite books on the history of woodworking and maybe different trends through the ages? Or books specific to a style of working, like Shaker or arts & crafts, etc.? And from Larry: I would love to see a Live Talk episode on “go to books” reference books for novice woodworkers.


Every two weeks, a team of Fine Woodworking staffers answers questions from readers on Shop Talk Live, Fine Woodworking‘s biweekly podcast. Send your woodworking questions to shoptalk@taunton.com for consideration in the regular broadcast! Our continued existence relies upon listener support. So if you enjoy the show, be sure to leave us a five-star rating and maybe even a nice comment on our iTunes page.

Direct download: shop-talk-live-episode-184.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:53am EDT

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